2008 Education Blogosphere Survey results

I’m both pleased and embarrassed to announce that the results from my second annual Education Blogosphere Survey are now available. Pleased to finally be done and that there were 419 participants. Embarrassed that the gestation almost exceeded that of a human newborn. Thank you, Dan Meyer, for politely staying on my case about this. I hope the results are worth the wait.

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Note that I didn’t do anything with the open-response items. Feel free to dig through one of the Excel files and do your own analysis (please let me know if you do!). There are lots of useful resources in the additional information in the database.

As always, these materials are available under a Creative Commons license. Let the conversation begin!

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7 Responses to “2008 Education Blogosphere Survey results”

  1. Scott, thanks for sharing. I love what you did with the data to make it more engaging.

    My response reflect my lack of engagement with the data:
    http://mguhlin.net/2008/10/read-reflect-blog.html

    Warm regards and many thanks for the beautiful way you reflected this data and the time it took to collect/organize it!!

    Miguel

  2. Scott, thanks for sharing. I love what you did with the data to make it more engaging.

    My response reflect my lack of engagement with the data:
    http://mguhlin.net/2008/10/read-reflect-blog.html

    Warm regards and many thanks for the beautiful way you reflected this data and the time it took to collect/organize it!!

    Miguel

  3. Hey Scott,

    No joke—what I appreciate the most about your work here on Dangerously Irrelevant are your attempts to “sort out” what educational blogging really looks like and means.

    The data is pertinent and helpful to me in my work as an advocate for educational blogging.

    Thanks for taking the time to put this together.

    Rock on,
    Bill

    BTW: The most interesting finding in the survey is how few teachers report feeling afraid of the consequences of blogging. In the recent US News article on teacher blogging, that was (unfortunately)a primary area of emphasis.

    In your work with school leaders, do they ever express a fear of what teachers might say on blogs? Are they monitoring the writing that their teachers are doing?

    I don’t ever feel threatened because I write responsibly, but I’d be interested in knowing how many school leaders are actually monitoring what their teacher-bloggers are writing.

    Maybe I should feel threatened!

  4. Congratulations! This post will be included in the Mole Day edition of the Carnival of Education. You will be able to see it in action at the URL I submitted with the comments, once the link goes live on October 22. I thank you in advance for any plugs that you do for the CoE edition.

  5. The 2008 report reveals just how pervasive blogs have become , and the extent to which they are a part of our daily lives. The figures supporting this vary from survey to survey, but all are now consistently high!.
    —————————–
    anna jennifer
    Promoter

  6. Great graphic with the lawnmowers, very creative and funny!!!
    Agree with a lot of the findings.
    Frustrating the whiteness of the results.
    Made Iowa look uninvolved, no we were not all out in the fields harvesting corn and beans.
    Not surprised with the secondary teacher results, let me tell you that early childhood teachers have a difficult time getting to a computer, even when they want to.
    Fine Arts teachers 18, maybe more would help the graphics on some blog sites.

    Just couple of things I would like to know from the results, perhaps next year…
    1. When blogging do you look for articles you agree with, disagree with, or does not matter.
    2. When responding to a blog article are you supportive, non-supportive, or asking for more information.
    Just wondering what people are thinking when they look for posts.

  7. probably a difficult percentage to get a handle on. In an attempt to get at just this kind of info, we surveyed Hamline University students, faculty, and staff last month about their awareness and use of blogging. One subset of questions asked respondents whether blogging was being used in their instructional setting

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