Archive | News and Events RSS feed for this section

Happy 10th birthday, Dangerously Irrelevant!

10th birthday cake

Today is the 10th birthday of Dangerously Irrelevant. I can’t believe that I’ve been blogging for an entire decade. It seems like just yesterday that I was at the University of Minnesota and considering whether a blog might be a good idea (it was). Although I still feel young (‘I’m not dead yet!’), I believe that a decade of continuous blogging may make me one of the elders of the edublogosphere (for example, using the word ‘edublogosphere’ most definitely dates me!).

A huge thank you to everyone who is a loyal reader and to all of you who have been willing to engage with what I share. I have learned an incredible amount due to your willingness to leave comments, extend conversations, suggest resources, connect me with others, tell me that what I just wrote was stupid, and so on. Together we are amazingly powerful. I am greatly appreciative of my last ten years of learning with you.

Although it’s been a quiet summer here as I have navigated selling a home, buying a home, relocating my family, starting a new job, and sending my oldest child off to her first year at college, you better believe that I will be ramping up here again in the next week or so. Looking forward to the next decade of blogging!

Iowa at ISTE

2016ISTEMcLeod

I was given ISTE’s Award for Outstanding Leadership this afternoon. That was fun.  :)

Today was a great day for Iowa at ISTE. In addition to myself… 

#IowaRocksOut

#educolor – The most important hashtag you’re probably not following

educolor.org

Two years ago this fall, Jose Vilson launched EduColor. It’s a website, it’s a hashtag, it’s an email newsletter, it’s a weekly chat, it’s a call for social justice. Most of all, as he and the other organizers say, it’s ‘a movement, not a moment.’

Many of us haven’t paid too much attention to EduColor. Maybe it’s because we’ve never heard of it (now you have). But maybe it’s because we don’t recognize the privilege that allows us to not feel any urgency to attend to the needs of our colleagues of color. Maybe it’s because we’re too focused on our own thing to worry about that other thing over there. Or, honestly, maybe it’s because talk about racial and other inequities makes us uncomfortable and we don’t know how to effectively participate and be of support.

It doesn’t take much effort to sign up for the twice-per-month EduColor newsletter and follow the #educolor hashtag. And, at a very minimum, we should do those two things. Not because of social justice hectoring or out of some sense of privileged guilt or because we think it makes us look good but because the resources that are being shared and the conversations that are being held are IMPORTANT. In a nation that soon will be ‘majority minority’ but definitely has a long way to go toward equity, all of us need to be more aware and more action-oriented regarding the concerns of our friends, neighbors, students, and educators of color. Yes, some of the things that we read may make us uncomfortable. But you know what? As Jose says, being uncomfortable needs to become our new comfortable. How are we going to meet the needs of all of our children if we can’t put uncomfortable topics on the table and discuss them? How are we going to remedy the ongoing racial disparities in resource allocation, school resegregation, negative media, disciplinary punishments, achievement gaps, instructional neglect, college and career readiness, digital equity, and many other educational areas if we’re not willing to face them head on with the awareness, humility, regret, and courage that they deserve?

The historical legacies of racism continue to linger large today and they manifest themselves on numerous ongoing fronts when it comes to schools, teachers, and students. EduColor is a good place to start thinking more deeply about these issues. You will meet some new people and, more importantly, you will probably learn something and might even be energized to take productive action. Head on over there and sign up. And send your colleagues and students there too. It will only take a moment. (and you might be inspired toward movement)

Digital Leadership Daily now has over 1,000 subscribers

Digital Leadership Daily Photo

I’m pleased to note that Digital Leadership Daily is now reaching over 1,000 daily subscribers via its SMS, Facebook, and Twitter channels.

Fifteen months ago I decided to send out one high-quality technology leadership resource per day through this new dissemination channel. I figured that it was a good way to reach folks without overwhelming them. As I said when I introduced the service, I don’t think it can get any easier to learn than this…

I’ve had numerous busy school leaders tell me that Digital Leadership Daily is serving their learning needs well. It exposes them to new authors, gives them something to think about (and pass along to others) each morning, and comes to them directly rather than them having to seek it out.

Have you signed up yourself? If not, now is a good time! Know an administrator or teacher leader who might benefit from Digital Leadership Daily? I bet you do!

Thanks for a great run, Iowa

Some of you know that I’m headed back to higher education (after a 4-year hiatus to keep a promise to my daughter that she could finish high school here in Ames, Iowa). I will be an Associate Professor of Educational Leadership at the University of Colorado-Denver starting in August. We will miss Iowa tremendously but we’re also excited to explore some gorgeous mountains!

I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve done the past 9 years in this state with the very substantial help and partnership of some wonderful colleagues. Here’s a partial list:

  • rejuvenated a struggling educational leadership program at Iowa State University, including doubling our program’s enrollment, faculty, and tuition revenue;
  • graduated 13 Ph.D. students as their primary advisor;
  • brought in over $350,000 in external grants and contracts;
  • published 18 peer-reviewed articles, 1 book, 6 book chapters, 32 invited publications, 8 research briefs and white papers, and 63 other publications;
  • was a visiting faculty fellow in New Zealand;
  • worked with over 130 different Iowa schools, associations, and other organizations;
  • immersed several hundred Iowa principals and superintendents in 6 to 12 days of technology leadership development;
  • sparked the nation’s largest statewide, grass roots 1:1 computing initiative (220+ districts and counting);
  • launched the annual Iowa 1:1 Institute, which rivals in size the other major education conferences in Iowa;
  • initiated EdCampIowa, which I believe is still the nation’s largest single-day EdCamp event;
  • launched the new technology innovation team for Prairie Lakes Area Education Agency;
  • created the trudacot technology integration discussion protocol, which is now spreading across the globe;
  • delivered hundreds of keynote, peer-reviewed academic, and other presentations and workshops, including 2 endowed lectures;
  • created 3 new Did You Know? (Shift Happens) videos and numerous other digital and online resources;
  • supported thousands of Iowa teachers and administrators as they move toward deeper thinking, student agency, authentic work, and technology infusion;
  • was a visible and vocal advocate for Iowa students and public schools;
  • served in dozens of advisory board, task force, editorial board, and other state and national leadership and service roles;
  • named one of three finalists to be the Director of the Iowa Department of Education;
  • received the ITEC Technology Leadership Award, the School Administrators of Iowa Friend of the Association Award, the Phi Delta Kappa Emerging Leader Award, the National School Boards Association 20 to Watch Award, the Center for Digital Education Education Innovator Award, and the ISTE Award for Outstanding Leadership.

That seems like a pretty good run to me… Thanks to everyone who’s been a part of this fun and hopefully-impactful work. Looking forward to my next adventures!

Redesigning technology-infused lessons and units at ASB Unplugged

I facilitated three workshops at ASB Unplugged in Mumbai, India this year for international school educators. All three sessions went extremely well and the folks at the American School of Bombay were impeccable hosts, as always.

In my sessions we discussed deeper learning, greater student agency, more authentic work, and rich technology infusion. We utilized the trudacot discussion protocol to redesign lessons, units, and other learning activities. We had some amazing conversations and came up with all kinds of ways to #makeitbetter. Padlet screenshots are below. Right-click on the image to see a larger version or click on the date to see the actual Padlet. Let me know as you have questions. I love working with administrators and teachers on this kind of redesign work!

February 24

ASB Unplugged Feb 24

February 26

ASB Unplugged Feb 26

February 27

ASB Unplugged Feb 27

BloomBoard collection: Rethinking AUPs

BloomBoard invited me to be part of its February blogging campaign and to create a collection over at its site. I tried to pull together a few resources related to acceptable use policies (AUPs):

The blogger that follows me in BloomBoard’s campaign is Shannon Holden over at NewTeacherHelp. You also can check out others’ contributions at the BloomBoard blog. Hope these resources are helpful to you!

Summits

Summit. (noun) A day-long ’sit and get’ event designed to draw political and media attention to the powers-that-be at the top. Usually comprised of speeches, panel presentations, and non-interactive breakout sessions. Iowa antonyms: EdCampIowa, ISLI, StuCamp, EdCampDesMoines, school district unconferences, Iowa 1:1 Institute.

Summits are a great way to reinforce the passive, transmission-oriented model of learning.

Summits are a great way to get your own supportive talking heads on stage and not those of others.

Summits are a great way to talk at rather than with.

Summits are a great way to hammer home that certain people and perspectives get voices and others do not.

In Iowa, we like education summits: 

My keynote for the 2015 K12 Online Conference

McleodK12online

My keynote for the 2015 K12 Online Conference is now available. It’s long because within it I profile numerous examples of innovative schools. Here is the description for my session:

Whenever any sort of change or innovation is discussed, the ‘Yes, but…’ objections are inevitable. However, instead of allowing those resistance points to dominate and defeat promising ideas, teachers and administrators can reframe opposition into possibility by asking the questions ‘Why not?’ and ‘How can we?’ Effective educators focus on adaptation, forward progress, and collective effort and efficacy. The ‘yes, buts’ don’t do anything except keep us stuck. Too often we get mired in negativity and defeatism instead of recognizing that – both individually and collectively – we usually have the ability to do and be so much more than our current reality reflects. This keynote focuses on transformative leadership mindsets and features exemplary schools from around the world that are ignoring the ‘yes, buts’ to make amazing things happen for children and youth.

Check it out and get some great ideas for changes you might make in your school. Be sure to see all of the other wonderful presentations too. The four conference strands this year are Maker Ed, Stories of Connection, Overcoming Obstacles, and Beyond The Core: Art and More. Did I mention the conference is FREE?!

Happy viewing!

Some shout-outs this year

Onalytica

A few shout-outs that this blog has gotten this year…

  1. Onalytica calculated Dangerously Irrelevant to be the 5th-most influential educational technology and e-learning blog in the world.
  2. EdTech magazine named Dangerously Irrelevant as one of its ‘must read’ K-12 IT blogs for 2015.
  3. Getting Smart included Dangerously Irrelevant as one of its 55+ ‘great blogs and blasts’ and also was kind enough to put me on its list of 50 people shaping the future of K-12 education.

Thanks, everyone, for the recognitions. Much appreciated!

Switch to our mobile site