ISTE Community Leaders: Apply for the 2024-2025 cohort

ISTE Community Leaders: Apply for the 2024-2025 cohort

[I am highlighting various initiatives of the ISTE Community Leaders…]

For the past week or so, I’ve been sharing some of the many things that ISTE Community Leaders do. From our new podcast to expert webinars, from helping others within ISTE Connect to meetups and conference events, we are busy but also are having a blast. If all of this sounds fun to you too, applications for the 2024-2025 ISTE Community Leaders cohort are now open. Hope some of you are interested and apply!

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ISTE Community Leaders: ISTE Connect

ISTE Community Leaders: ISTE Connect

[I am highlighting various initiatives of the ISTE Community Leaders…]

Perhaps the main responsibility of the ISTE Community Leaders is to engage with the larger ISTE community within ISTE Connect. ISTE Connect has numerous job role groups, including ed tech and instructional coaches, educational leaders, librarians, higher education, and P-12 educators. ISTE Connect also has topic groups that range widely, from AI to curriculum to digital citizenship to STEAM to equity, inclusion, and accessibility. There are LOTS of resources and numerous daily conversations shared across the ISTE Connect platform. ISTE Community Leaders answer questions, provide resources, connect folks, and try to spark interesting discussions as they support the needs that emerge in the online community. It’s super fun and I’ve interacted with a whole bunch of interesting people. If you’re not already engaged in ISTE Connect, come join us!

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ISTE Community Leaders: Expert webinars

ISTE Community Leaders: Expert webinars

[I am highlighting various initiatives of the ISTE Community Leaders…]

In addition to The Edge podcast, ongoing meetups, and various conference-related events, the ISTE Community Leaders also regularly host webinars on a variety of topics. Here is a list of upcoming and/or recent webinar topics:

Keep an eye out in ISTE (or ASCD) newsletters or other communications for information about upcoming webinars. There’s also usually a call for webinar proposals a couple of times per year. Happy listening!

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ISTE Community Leaders: Meetups and conferences

ISTE Community Leaders: Meetups and conferences

[I am highlighting various initiatives of the ISTE Community Leaders…]

In my last post I mentioned that the ISTE Community Leaders are doing amazing things. I have been particularly impressed with the frequency and variety of the meetups and conference events led by the Community Leaders. As an example, in recent months the Community Leaders have hosted meetups related to “meeting students where they are,” strategies for educational technology coaching, and a makerspace-themed digital escape room.

Other big events include conferences and in-person events. Some of the Community Leaders hosted the Global Impact Virtual Conference. You will see several Community Leader-hosted playgrounds at ISTELive24. I am keynoting – and several of us are helping with – the 2024 Summer ASCD + ISTE Summer Leaders Meetup in Colorado Springs. And so on…

As I mentioned, we’ve got a lot going on!

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ISTE Community Leaders: The Edge

ISTE Community Leaders: The Edge

I have been involved with the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) for over two decades. ISTE was a major supporter of our School Technology Leadership Initiative (STLI) at the University of Minnesota, a $2.5 million federally-funded project which, among other things, created the first graduate program designed to prepare a technology-savvy school leader. STLI later morphed into the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), which was the first university center in the USA focused on technology, leadership, innovation, and deeper learning. As the Founding Director (and current Co-Director) of CASTLE, I served on the original advisory board for ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators (the NETS-A), and since have served ISTE as a professional learning partner, reviewer, workshop facilitator, and Ambassador. I was the recipent of ISTE’s global Award for Outstanding Leadership in 2016, and this year I am helping plan and host ISTELive here in Denver. To say that I am grateful for my relationship with ISTE would be an understatement!

For the past few years, I have been fortunate to serve as an ISTE Community Leader. There are a few dozen of us, located all around the world, and we have monthly virtual meetups in which we share what each other is doing, hear what ISTE is planning, and connect and design with each other. The Community Leaders are all doing amazing things, and our joy-filled, high energy meetings are a bucket filler for me each month.

The Community Leaders program has been around for only a few years, and I’m a huge fan. This week I will be highlighting some of what we do, starting with ISTE’s newest podcast, The Edge. The Edge evolved organically during the Community Leaders’ first couple of years together. The Edge is a podcast run by ISTE members, not ISTE staff, and the episodes are meant to highlight a variety of interesting activities happening in the ISTE community. Previous podcast topics (and guests) have included Building an E-Sports Program (with Julie Mavrogeorge), Outdoor Learning and Place-Based Education (with Paul Bocko), Neurodiverse Students and Inclusive Learning Environments (with Matthew Harrison), and Engaging Student Creativity (with Michael Hernandez).

If The Edge is not currently in your podcast listening cycle, I encourage you to check it out!

Books I read in April 2024

Books I read in April 2024

Books I finished reading (or rereading) in April 2024…

  1. The A.I. Roadmap, John Spencer (education)
  2. The AI Infused Classroom, Holly Clark (education)
  3. The AI Classroom, Dan Fitzpatrick, Amanda Fox, & Brad Weinstein (education)
  4. The Generative Age, Alanna Winnick (education)
  5. AI for Educators, Matt Miller (education)
  6. Learning Evolution, Carl Hooker (education)
  7. Active Learning with AI, Stephen Kosslyn (education)
  8. Education for the Age of AICharles Fadel et al. (education)
  9. Last Argument of Kings, Joe Abercrombie (fantasy)
  10. Wool, Hugh Howey (science fiction)
  11. Shift, Hugh Howey (science fiction)
  12. Dust, Hugh Howey (science fiction)
  13. Generation Ship, Michael Mammay (science fiction)
  14. The Jackal of Nar, John Marco (fantasy)
  15. Under Siege, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  16. Implacable Resolve, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction) 

Hope you’re reading something fun too!

BREAKING NEWS: Students are still bored

BREAKING NEWS: Students are still bored

Breaking news! A nationally-representative poll of more than 1,000 teenagers finds that… students are still bored. Here are some key findings:

  • 64% of teenagers think that school is boring
  • 70% of teenagers say that all or most of their classmates are bored in class
  • Only 41% of teenagers like going to school
  • Only 40% of teenagers think that their homework helps them learn
  • 30% of teenagers say that school is a waste of time
  • Only 19% of teenagers say that most of their classmates want to be in school

64% of teens think school is boring

 

These results just confirm earlier findings. This is a system that is fundamentally BROKEN. Everyone is expressing concern about students’ chronic absenteeism. But we’re just offering them the same old boring stuff. That’s not a successful sales pitch for a student who doesn’t want to come to school, is it?

What will we do about these recent findings? Probably the same thing that we’ve done in the past: nothing. As I said in an earlier post:

The biggest indictment of our schools is not their failure to raise test scores above some politically-determined line of ‘proficiency.’ It’s that – day in and day out – they routinely ignore the fact that our children are bored, disengaged, and disempowered. We’ve known this forever, but we have yet to really care about it in a way that would drive substantive changes in practice. The disenfranchisement of our youth continues to happen in the very institutions that are allegedly preparing them to be ‘life long learners.’

Shame on us.

Books I read in March 2024

Books I read in March 2024

Books I finished reading (or rereading) in March 2024…

  1. Never Enough, Jennifer Breheny Wallace (education)
  2. The Grand Conspiracy, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  3. Shield of Humanity, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  4. Fog of War, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  5. Ships of the Line, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  6. Operation Liberty, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)

Hope you’re reading something fun too!

It’s the bullying, not the tech

It’s the bullying, not the tech

Just leaving this graph here for folks who think that cyberbullying is a bigger scourge than in-person bullying in schools (because we often tend to demonize technology)…

These data are from NCES Report 2024-109, Student Reports of Bullying: Results From the 2022 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey [Table 2.1], and are consistent with past research on this topic. About 1 in 5 students (19%) in grades 6 through 12 reported being bullied during the 2021-2022 school year [Table 1.1], despite prevalent security measures. For example, the vast majority of bullied students said that their school had security guards or assigned police officers (77%), staff supervision in hallways (87%), security cameras (93%), and a student code of conduct (94%) [Table 3.2].

As we wring our hands and blame social media companies for poor student mental health, anxiety, and well-being, we have a lot that we need to attend to INSIDE schools as well.

Your thoughts?

Definitions

  • “Bullied” includes students who reported that another student made fun of them, called them names, or insulted them in a hurtful way; spread rumors about them or tried to make others dislike them; purposely shared their private information, photos, or videos in a hurtful way; threatened them with harm; pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on them; tried to make them do things they did not want to do, for example, giving them money or other things; excluded them from activities, social media, or other communications on purpose to hurt them; or destroyed their property on purpose.
  • “During school” includes interactions in the school building; on school property; on the school bus; going to and from school; and using the phone, internet, or social media during the 2021–22 school year.
Books I read in February 2024

Books I read in February 2024

Books I finished reading (or rereading) in February 2024…

  1. The Baseball 100, Joe Posnanski (baseball)
  2. Alias Emma, Ava Glass (thriller)
  3. 1000 Ultimate Adventures, Lonely Planet (travel)
  4. The Blade Itself, Joe Abercrombie (fantasy)
  5. Before They Are Hanged, Joe Abercrombie (fantasy)
  6. Bowlful, Norman Musa (cookbook)
  7. The Last Hunter, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  8. Bonds of Blood, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  9. Alpha Strike, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  10. The Enemy Revealed, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  11. Command Authority, J. N. Chaney & Terry Mixon (science fiction)
  12. The Book of Three, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)
  13. The Black Cauldron, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)
  14. The Castle of Llyr, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)
  15. Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)
  16. The High King, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)
  17. The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain, Lloyd Alexander (fantasy)

I received The Baseball 100 for Christmas. Wasn’t sure I was going to like it. It’s just a collection of stories about famous baseball players, like the shorter books from the library that I used to read when I was a kid, only for grownups! I LOVED IT.

Hope you’re reading something fun too!