Did You Know? predicts Armageddon?

Karl Fisch just sent me a link to this video. If you watch the first 10 minutes or so, you’ll see Hal Lindsey of the Trinity Broadcasting Network use Did You Know? (Jeff Brenman’s adaptation of the original version) as an indicator that Armageddon is near.

Oh, and if you like the video, you can order it on DVD at 1-800-Titus35.

5 Responses to “Did You Know? predicts Armageddon?”

  1. This is awesome! Imagine the author of the Late Great Planet Earth is citing Karl’s work! Woohoo! Kudos to Karl.

    Whether one agrees or not with how Karl’s slide show has been used, it’s amazing that it did get used and is being viewed by so many people.

  2. I was sent this article by my admin: http://tinyurl.com/33q2nt and was terribly disappointed that they didn’t credit Karl Fisch directly.

  3. Which only demonstrates that anyone can take a set of statistics and interpret them to fit their preconceived ideas.

    When we showed Karl’s original slide show to our trainers, one of them said that the presentation was racist. His interpretation was that the few slides about China and India were meant to scare people into responding to the “threat” coming from those countries.

    As I said, different people will see the same data in different ways. Although linking this to Armageddon is a pretty big stretch.

  4. Amazing. The Medici Effect, by Frans Johansson is filled with vivid stories of intersections across domains as wide-ranging as business, science, art, and politics. The author says it is out of those intersections that true innovation comes.

    I am always excited by the strength diversity brings to a discussion. Bringing very different ideas, perceptions, and schema together to seek truth or understanding typically results in completely new ideas or innovations. And in that place of intersection, my hope is that we will find the promise for positive school reform.

  5. I agree, Sheryl. It’s very Hegelian: thesis + antithesis = synthesis (or something like that!).

Leave a Reply