When I understand it, why do I have to repeat it twenty times?

Again and again

Students said:

“The teachers used to talk at us all the time, non-stop, but they never actually spoke to us.”

“Can you remember what it feels like to sit at a desk for a whole class, just listening? Have you any idea how much I just want to scream?”

“So, I get the practice part of homework, but when I understand the concept or idea the first time, why do I have to repeat it twenty times? Who made that the magic number of knowing?”

Mike Crowley said:

The truth is that we intuitively know what the word personal means and we understand that in order to make learning personal we need to make connections with young people, we need to make learning meaningful in contexts that are relevant to their current and future lives, and we need to stop doing things that we innately know no longer make sense. Young people want to do math and science, not observe it; they want to write for real audiences on blogs, not write the autobiography of a pencil; they want to address real-world problems in society today, not memorise the past; they want to create, explore, build, move, and express themselves and, most of all, they want to grow in an unshackled environment. Being talked at, sitting passively, engaging in rote learning – the vestiges of a pre-digital past – are no longer acceptable. There is no need for debate here. Our students are no longer listening. For them, learning is only ever personal, and, in order to engage them, to really help them grow, we need to keep the words of Alice in mind: “No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time.”

via http://crowleym.com/2015/05/10/gyre-gimble-fool-whats-the-point-of-school

2 Responses to “When I understand it, why do I have to repeat it twenty times?”

  1. “Being talked at, sitting passively, engaging in rote learning” didn’t work in pre-digital ages, either. You learn best when you are engaged in the activity, and when you treat your community and the world at large as your classroom.

    Thanks for a great post, and a great blog!

  2. Yes, we are missing interactive classes but I would like to mention something from the side of teachers. Teaching is a challenging profession that requires a lot of patience, innovation and motivation from the teachers in order to bring about an all round development among their students. Inside the classroom there will be a mixed section of learners based on their level of intelligence and performance criteria. It is among these learners, there will be some who cannot cope up with the lessons taught inside the classroom as their peers do and hence these learners are tagged as the slow learners.

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