Top 50 P-12 Edublogs? – June 2008

[cross-posted at the TechLearning blog]

Many of you know that I occasionally try to wrap my head around various aspects of the education blogosphere. In the past I’ve written about hubs and superhubs. I’ve also sometimes attempted to identify and quantify some of the most popular edublogs:

Below is my latest attempt. I made a few changes from last time, which I describe after the table. Authority and rank are from Technorati as of June 2. Clicking on each blog name will take you to its Technorati page.

 


Blog Name

2008
Authority
2008
Rank
1*
apophenia
1,256
1,880
2
Weblogg-ed
897
3,222
3
Joanne Jacobs
798
3,848
4
Stephen’s Web
708
4,581
5*
The Panda’s Thumb
563
6,314
6
2 Cents Worth
559
6,364
7
Cool Cat Teacher Blog
550
6,527
8
Moving At the Speed of Creativity
452
8,585
9
Ewan McIntosh’s edu.blogs.com
434
9,073
10
Students 2.0
415
9,601
11
Dangerously Irrelevant
413
9,650
12
The Fischbowl
402
9,999
13
Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites Of The Day…
292
15,222
14
Beyond School
281
16,003
15
EdTechTalk
255
18,132
16
The Thinking Stick
251
18,485
17*
Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub
247
18,889
18
CogDogBlog
243
19,288
19
Angela Maiers
241
19,497
20
Ideas and Thoughts from an EdTech
233
20,369
21
Techlearning blog
231
20,603
22
elearnspace
231
20,603
23
dy/dan
223
21,531
24
Around the Corner
219
22,034
25
Practical Theory
211
23,110
26
Open Thinking & Digital Pedagogy
197
25,258
27
Steve Hargadon
194
25,760
28
Half an Hour
187
27,002
29
k12 Online Conference
180
28,355
30
Mobile Technology in TAFE
179
28,551
31
blog of proximal development
171
30,308
32
HeyJude
168
30,991
33
Blue Skunk
164
31,997
34
The Education Wonks
164
31,997
35
Drape’s Takes
162
32,533
36
Always Learning
162
52,728
37*
The Learning Circuits Blog
157
33,890
38
Remote Access
152
35,296
39
PBS Teachers . Learning.now
151
35,621
40
Eduwonkette
150
35,920
41
So You Want To Teach?
149
58,157
42
Eduwonk
148
36,614
43
Teach42
147
36,964
44
History Is Elementary
145
37,670
45
LeaderTalk
144
38,026
46
Infinite Thinking Machine
137
40,556
47
Creating Lifelong Learners
133
42,160
48
AssortedStuff
131
42,997
49
Connectivism Blog
128
44,360
50
think:lab
122
47,149
51
O’DonnellWeb
121
47,646
52
iterating toward openness
119
48,680
53
Teaching Generation Z
119
48,680
54
Generation YES Blog
112
52,751

Information about the table

  • This time I only included blogs that predominantly post about P-12 education. No higher education blogs. No blogs that are mostly about training, software tools, or other topics with an occasional P-12–related post. No education news channels that happen to have an RSS feed. Just ‘pure’ P-12 blogs. I was on the fence about four blogs on the chart; those are marked with an asterisk. I included blogs 51 to 54 in case you think those four should not have been included.
  • I gave up monitoring the several thousand blogs on my previous list. There were just too many to catalog and also too many newcomers. There are over 100,000 edublogs!
  • I feel fairly confident about the accuracy of this list. I considered listing the top 100 but was not as confident about blogs 70 to 100 because I kept finding new ones in that range.
  • If I missed you, I’m sorry. Please let me know for next time. If you don’t like or disagree with my selection criteria, feel free to make your own list. It would be interesting to compare yours with this one.
  • The very notion of what constitutes a ‘top’ edublog is very personal and individual (see, e.g., posts by Stephen Downes and Peter Rock as well as the numerous comments regarding my last two attempts). Also, Technorati has a number of issues, but no one has yet suggested a more viable alternative. There are many, many great blogs not on this list. While a number of people are finding value in the blogs in this table, some excellent writing is occurring on blogs with lower authority. Read and write blogs for your own reasons rather than worrying about the numbers.

Other lists of top edublogs

Other attempts have been made to catalog the top edublogs. Of note are the following:

Some stats on Alltop

Only 19 of the top 50 blogs in the chart above are on Alltop Education. Interestingly, I also discovered that at least 9 of the blogs on Alltop Education have an authority of less than 26, meaning that they have less than one inbound link per week.

Alltop01

Blogs with big gains in authority

Take heart, bloggers who want more readers / links! As the chart below shows, a number of the blogs on this list had large gains in authority over the past 11 months. Some of the top blogs (including Students 2.0, Angela Maiers, and Eduwonkette) didn’t even exist a year ago.

2008authoritygains

Final thoughts

As always, please let me know if you have any thoughts or reactions regarding this post. I am deeply honored that so many of you choose to read my blogs, appreciate any and all feedback, and look forward to the conversation!

34 Responses to “Top 50 P-12 Edublogs? – June 2008”

  1. Making a list can be dangerous(ly relevant?) but anytime anyone does, I appreciate it as it turns my attention to some sites that might otherwise escape me.
    So, thanks.

    Kevin

  2. Two, perhaps related thoughts. First, what percentage of those blogs are focused mostly on issues of ed. tech? As best I can tell, at least 13 of the top 15 are (I’m not counting #1…).
    Second (and I guess relatedly), it surprises me not to see folks like Matthew Tabor, Alex Russo, Gary Stager, Sherman Dorn, etc. there. Dorn’s been blogging (and well, IMHO) for a LONG time. I see Eduwonkette in the mix, but I’m certain she benefits from her affiliation with Ed. Week (not that she doesn’t deserver consideration as a “top” blogger). Are there so few people interested in the larger ed. policy issues? I think I’ll write a blog post about this…

  3. You should have mentioned DetentionSlip.org they are ranked 10 on Alltop, just won Best Education Blog of the Year, and are read by thousands of teachers daily!

    http://detentionslip.org

  4. I’m relatively new to the edublog world, so I’m checking out these rankings for new reads. The #1 weblog has compiled a “Best Of” posts page, but I found that it only has the word “education” once, and the word “teaching” zero times. How did it make it to the top of the chart?

    http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/bestof.html

  5. @Jon:

    Personally, I am glad to see fewer than expected “policy” blogs in the mix. A lot of what goes on in the policy blogs is a Washington insiders game of charters and unions and testing and fish porn (ok, I like the fish porn). I realize education policy is pretty important, but how you teach history is pretty important too. I want the policy information conveyed to the masses like everyone else, but a lot of what goes on in the ed. policy blogs is writing for other ed. policy blogs, not for the general education audience.

    I do think there is an over representation of tech blogs, but that is to be expected at this stage of the development of Web 2.0. Because Scott is using Technorati ratings, the biggest interest group of bloggers on the web are going to have the largest representation on here. Still the largest intra-education interest group that have their own blogs to generate Technorati rating is Ed. Tech folks so it comes as no surprise to me that Ed. Tech is highly (over) represented. It would be interesting if Scott were to do an Ed-Tech list and a non ed-tech list.

    The simple fact is that we have to come up with a better way to measure this eventually than Technorati ratings (I have no problem with Scott using it now as it is the best we have). As you said, highly influential blogs like Russo’s and Dorns and others should be on most “top” lists, but have not been citied by enough different blogs to be included in the Technorati rating.

    I saw that TaxProf Blog uses site hits and page views to create a legal list of law professor blawgs, but that relies on people putting a sitemeter on their blog that others can view. Of course, the law also has their own legal blog directories, which all relevant legal blogs submit to, so there is a ready made tracking and popularity system. See (http://www.justia.com/). Those are not the best ways either, but I do think they come closer to measuring actual influence of blogs.

    Still, I like these lists because like Kevin I get to learn about new blogs I otherwise might not know about that others are finding valuable.

  6. This list is very timely for me. I am working on a course about blogging in the classroom. I will share definitely share this list with my students!

    There are a lot of Ed Tech blogs and they don’t appeal to the average teacher who is not a tech junkie. Would you consider doing a “Top 10 Classroom Blogs” list?

  7. I REALLY appreciate the question mark on your post title, as these results are most likely not the top 50 blogs about education. Given that Technorati’s blog search and Google’s blog search often give different results, it’s also the case to manipulate the results using different search strings.

    I appreciate that you stated in your previous posting (from 2007) that you searched for blogs tagged with both “education” and “school”. It’s a shame that you didn’t do the same with this posting, as searching today, with various tags, produces results both similar and wholly dissimilar to your list; which is my general complaint with using search-results for compiling lists. As you stated, there are literally hundreds of thousands of education blogs, and many of them may contain fantastic resources, but when you post a list like this it’s not a list of who has the best content, or the most reflective, simply just the blogs with the most sites and other blogs pointing to it. Which often will give you the blogs with the more popular content, but not always the most valuable.

  8. @Ben: Right. What’s ‘the most valuable’ is in the eye of the beholder. But, as I said in my post on hubs and superhubs, neither should we discount the blogs with ‘the more popular content.’ We must recognize, like for a best-selling book or a hit song, that the reason these blogs are popular are because readers are finding value in them. Otherwise folks will simply unsubscribe and continue on with their lives. So we have to simultaneously work to bring to the fore smaller blogs with excellent content while also utilizing the power of the hubs and superhubs for dissemination and sharing.

    FYI, for this time around I didn’t do an open search. I went deep into the list from last time, seeing who moved up or down. I also investigated notable newcomers and utilized the other lists mentioned above. If your Google blog search results indicate that I missed someone, please let me know for next time. This is fairly difficult and time-consuming work so I’d appreciate any help I can get!

  9. If you look at http://educaton.alltop.com/ you will now see that all fifty of your selection are in. :-)

    Guy

  10. You should consider the Tempered Radical
    http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2008/06/surviving-digit.html

    He is a middle school teacher and is doing some great things with his students. Bill tends to right about things that everyone is thinking, but nobody is talking about.

  11. I did look at Bill’s stats. His readership hasn’t risen yet to the level sufficient to enter the top 50. He’s a great read, though (as are many others)!

  12. Thanks for the inclusion of the Generation YES blog! I’m sort of charmed by the thought of being #54 on the list of top 50! ;-)

  13. Thanks for the list, Scott. I made this list, and I’m still wondering how to make this count for my annual review. :-)

  14. Great list (and I follow many of these) but does anyone put out a top list of higher ed edublogs (which is what I consider mine)???

  15. At Shaping Youth, my nonprofit where we cover media and marketing’s impact on kids, (always an education!) I like to treat analytics, rankings, lists and even ‘awards’ as mostly an aggregating method to turn me onto new sites, as well as pointing me to who has their marketing methodology in ‘meme’ mode or focusing on a sophisticated SEO play.

    For instance, I just got pinged from ‘Wikio’ congratulating Shaping Youth for being “#29 in the world in biz blogs,” asking if we want a ‘badge’ and such…but guess what? I don’t remotely consider myself a biz blog!

    We deal with all aspects of K-12 and youth media/mktg. literacy, ‘e-learning’ and techno tools to make the world a better place…but is that ‘biz?’ I think not.

    I immediately forwarded the accolade to my co-authors at Age of Conversation.com (the probono social media project for Variety, the children’s charity) who are much more savvy on the social media/digerati side than I am…As predicted, though the ranking was indeed ‘true’ and included me above some of our AOC crew w/technorati rankings out the wazoo, (I was incredulous) it was not an indicator of our ‘authority’ or our value by any means…so I shrugged it off as yet another piece of my ongoing learning puzzle in digital education.

    Speaking of cool sites and education though…have any of you visited the RezEd.org community of educators in virtual worlds? There’s a K-12 group that snagged my interest, fyi.

    p.s. Surprised edu-blogger Vicki Davis of Cool Cat Teacher/Women of Web 2.0 isn’t on here, she’s awesome…though maybe they treat wikispaces as entities in themselves? I can see this will be a ‘lifelong learning’ process! Whew.

    (btw, I arrived here via Generation Yes, #54!) ;-) –Amy

  16. Thanks for even thinking of Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub. Flattery goes a long way with me.

    The idea of figuring out which are the 50 most-read blogs is a good idea. Maybe someday we’ll figure out a solid method (and Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub probably won’t make the list then); in the interim, you’ve already introduced me to a dozen blogs I didn’t know about. That’s worth the price of the list right there.

  17. The Panda’s Thumb Crew appreciates you including us in your list. While we are not exclusively an education blog, on the order of 500 of our posts are about education, mostly in defense of P-12 public school science education. While we wear an asterisk, we do so proudly. :)

  18. Scott, the list comes out at the perfect time. Many teachers are “off for the summer” and have some much needed time to read and learn. I am looking forward to that myself and appreciate you introducing me to new perspectives and sites.

    It is an honor and privilege to be included among these great voices.

  19. Thanks for the work, Scott (and Amy, Vicki _is_ included, in the top 10 or so).

    Interesting breakdown, though – by my count, 3 or 3 teachers from k-12 classrooms, and one student blog, out of 50. What do we make of this?

  20. Once again….thanks for the number crunching. I’ve been a little behind lately in locating some of the newer reads that are out there, so your list always comes in handy. I’m humbled that History Is Elementary is included in the mix.

  21. This list is horrible!–but only because my blog isn’t on it :-)

  22. Scott, great list. There are a lot of good bloggers on that list.

    Have you seen TeacherLingo.com? It’s a community dedicated to teachers. Anyone on your list can add their blog to the directory. I believe a few are already members too.

  23. Scott, I’m now at the bottom of the blog heap, having moved my blog from where it resided for 4.5 years–www.edsupport.cc/mguhlin–to http://mguhlin.blogspot.com

    My Technorati relevance is 4 million plus, and you know what, that’s fine by me. Let’s see how long it takes to rise to the top, or at least, the 25K level where I was. I was able to keep my subscribers, whew!

    So, I’m an underdog unknown now and you can take me off your top 25 edublogs list. That way the Edjurist won’t feel so intimidated when I say some of the espoused ideas are hypocritical! (smile)

    And, if we all moved periodically, what would that do to the rating game?

    Warm regards,
    Miguel Guhlin
    Around the Corner-MGuhlin.net
    http://mguhlin.net

  24. Over the last several months, this list has been the inspiration for a weekend programming project: an interactive, animated tagcloud of the edu-blogosphere. The idea is to get a sense of the overall conversation, be able to drill down and compare different authors and time periods, and then be able to click through to specific posts.

    Now that it’s done, you can check it out or download the source at http://jasonpriem.com/feedvis . Thanks for the the work you put into compiling the list!

  25. The State of the Education Blogosphere

    Controversy is nothing new for education and the rise of education blogs is not exempt from that reality.

  26. The State of the Education Blogosphere

    Controversy is nothing new for education and the rise of education blogs is not exempt from that reality.

  27. The State of the Education Blogosphere

    Controversy is nothing new for education and the rise of education blogs is not exempt from that reality.

  28. Woo hoo! Were in the top 50 (sort of)

    Scott McLeod of the Dangerously Irrelevant blog does a semi-annual round-up of edu-blogs, based on Technorati ranking. For the first time, the Generation YES blog made the list of top 50, coming in (drumroll) dead last in spot number 54. Yes, we…

  29. My Technorati relevance is 4 million plus, and you know what, that’s fine by me. Let’s see how long it takes to rise to the top, or at least, the 25K level where I was. I was able to keep my subscribers, whew!

  30. Scott: I searched your site and did not see it, so thought I would ask if you have updated this list since 2008? http://dangerouslyirrelevant.org/2008/06/top-50-p-12-edu.html

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Top 50 Edublogs? | SoYouWantToTeach.Com - June 27, 2010

    […] also points out that Scott McLeod has been doing his homework. He has a list of Top 50 P-12 Edublogs? that he has recently compiled. Some great blogs worth checking out there. The list […]

  2. ODonnellWeb recognized as a top 50 Edublog | O'DonnellWeb - August 8, 2010

    […] guess what I’m doing here could be considered edublogging. Sort of. I guess. And I love that I’m #51 in the top 50 list. It seems very […]

  3. What is Link Love? Why does it make a difference to bloggers? | Cool Cat Teacher Blog - October 25, 2013

    […] people don’t like the technorati authority system, for now it is what we’ve got. (See Scott McLeod’s recent post on the top Edublogs — it is based on Technorati Authority […]

Leave a Reply

Switch to our mobile site