Tag Archives: science

Countdown to ISTE 02: Science education blogs (aka THE PUSH 2014)

The Push 2014If you were asked to nominate a very short list of blogs for science educators to read / subscribe to, what would you share? Please submit to the list! (there’s a form at the end of this post)

What are some excellent science education blogs that P-12 science educators should be reading? We need both elementary and secondary examples. Please contribute, see the responses, AND share this post with others so that we can get the best list possible.

What science education blogs would you recommend? http://bit.ly/1p3zOjS Please share with others so we get a great list! #sciedchat #edtech

Thanks in advance for helping with this initiative. If we all contribute, we should have a bevy of excellent subject-specific blogs to which we all can point. Please spread the word about THE PUSH!

[Next up: English / language arts education]

—–

What is THE PUSH?

Every day between now and the ISTE conference, we work together to identify excellent subject-specific blogs that are useful to P-12 teachers. Why? Several reasons…

  • To identify blogs that P-12 teachers can use to initially seed (or expand) their RSS readers (e.g., Feedly, FlipboardReeder, Pulse)
  • To facilitate the creation of online, global (not just local) communities of practice by connecting role-alike peers
  • To create a single location where P-12 educators can go to see excellent subject-oriented educational blogging
  • To highlight excellent disciplinary blogging that deserves larger audiences
  • To learn from disciplines other than our own and get ideas about our own teaching and/or blogging

We are looking for blogs with RSS feeds – particularly from P-12 educators – not sites to which we can’t subscribe. This is an effort to update the awesome but now heavily-spammed list we made 5 years ago!

Sioux Central students are making trebuchets, learning physics [VIDEO]

Are your students learning physics by making trebuchets, catapults, and ballistae? Why not? Students in the Sioux Central (IA) Community Schools are and they’re having a blast! (literally)

Are you not entertained?! Great work, Dan Strohmyer!

Rethinking expenditures and policy priorities

The National Association of Science Teachers reports that we currently have approximately 180,000 science teachers in middle schools and high schools. We could replace all of them (which I hasten to add is not necessary) and give their successors full 4-year scholarships as science majors to the State University of New York (where in-state tuition and fees run about $7,000 per year) for less than half the cost of a single $11 billion Nimitz Class aircraft carrier. With the money left over, we could buy new inquiry-based science curricula for every elementary and middle school, train all existing elementary school teachers on the new Next Generation Science Standards, and provide high-quality professional development for every math teacher in the country.

Harold Levy via http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/09/10/science-teaching-vs-aircraft-carriers.html

You’ve got 6 hours of student effort per day. What will you ask of it?

ScienceWe want to uncover what propels sustained energy in all students regardless of peers, parents, poverty, or tenure.  What occurs systemically that, done differently, could quickly galvanize students?  The resource available tomorrow morning is six hours of student effort.  What will you ask of it?

First, get an outcome picture clear.  It’s not of students passing a test (only to discard it on exiting their “final.”)  It’s not students getting A’s on assignments they never look at again.  It’s not teachers “preparing them for the exam” with review questions that formerly would have been teacher-complicit cheating. The outcome picture instead captures a competence and an attitude about it. In your mind’s eye, assemble a roomful of students each of whom is enthusiastic about science;  who willingly do more than required, who are more interested in the work they do than in the grade they receive.

Running that movie as what we want instruction to produce, we inquire what goes on in students’ minds.  What can we reasonably presume occurs there?  What conditions underlie that scene to generate interest and commitment?

I submit that only one cause is strong enough. An idea seizes their imagination, and they identify personally with its pursuit. Their idea fuses the tools of science with a mental purpose, and the two mesh smoothly.

John Jensen via http://www.educationnews.org/k-12-schools/why-kids-dont-master-science-teaching-science-that-sticks

Image credit: Science, from Bigstock


Switch to our mobile site