Tag Archives: George Couros

Less submissiveness. More voice.

Shout out loud

George Couros says:

As a teacher, would you prefer to work in an environment where [your] principal (who is [your] boss) wants feedback on the things that are happening in the school and actively listens? This doesn’t mean [she] always agree[s], but that you know [she] genuinely takes feedback in the workplace and figures out a way to implement some suggestions.

Or would you simply want to do what you were told, because that’s what you should do?

And in a comment to George’s post, Jim Cordery says:

We want people to act/think outside of the box, until those students end up sitting in our rooms. Then, the questioning of things is seen as defiance.

We need less submissiveness. We need more questions. We need more voice. From students. From educators. From citizens. From you.

I’m ready to kick my blog up a notch or two this year. Consider yourself forewarned…

Image credit: Shout Out Loud, Gary Denness

Banned from the biggest library in the world

George Couros says:

If we got rid of a library in a school, people would be outraged that [we were] taking away information away from students, yet kids often hold the biggest library in the world in their pocket[s] and schools ban them from using it in the classroom.

via http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/4278

They can use it at home but, hey, let’s just ignore that. Blocking is always better than educating, right?

Playingwithinformation

Image credit: playing with information, Will Lion 

Making judgments about technologies we haven’t used and don’t understand

George Couros says:

“Kids don’t have enough balance.”

“We are dumber because of technology.”

“People are disconnected from one another because of how we use technology.”

“Technology kills our face-to-face interactions.”

In my travels, I have heard all of these arguments.

You will hear people say things like “Twitter is stupid.” Just to clarify, Twitter is a thing and can’t be stupid. It is the equivalent of a student not understanding math and then saying “math is stupid.” It is often our lack of understanding that leads us to make statements like this, which I made myself. One of the questions that I ask people when they make these remarks is, “from your use of Twitter, tell me why it is stupid?”, which is sometimes followed by, “Well, I have never used it.” That would be the equivalent of me saying that a Lamborghini handles terribly. I could say that, but I have never experienced driving one, nor have I ever done any research on the vehicle.

via http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/4271

The ups and downs of educational technology advocacy

Sometimes I read things like this post from George Couros and am uplifted that some educators are working hard to transition their schools into a digital, global era:

Take a twenty minute period in my life as evidenced below.

I read a blog post found in my Reader feed, which leads me to a link on YouTube, that leads me to a quote, which leads me to the person who stated the quote, to find a link on their Twitter profile, only to find another article on something that I would have never found myself.

I could go on from there, and I eventually will, but it is just amazing how one item, leads to another, and another, and so on.

That is how learning should be: continuous, connected, and meaningful.

And then I have exchanges like the one I had yesterday (excerpts are below) and am reminded about how far we still have to go.

No recognition that our knowledge environment is completely technology-suffused… No recognition that at what is apparently a great school, students could do amazing and powerful things with technology…

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1,133 educational leaders to kickstart your Twitter feed

Twitterbirdblueonwhite

Got an administrator in your school or district who’s interested in Twitter but doesn’t know whom to follow? Interested in connecting online with more administrators yourself? Get started with these 1,133 educational leaders on Twitter! [UPDATE: Now up to over 2,000 leaders!]

I’ll keep adding to this collection. Special thanks to Patrick Larkin, George Couros, Lyn Hilt, Chris Lehmann, Dan Frazier, and others for helping me expand my existing list. If you’re maintaining a Twitter list of P-12 educational administrators that I should know about, or would like to chat about creative ways to use these lists, get in touch!

[Continuing what I hope will be a months-long wave of resources for school leaders and the programs that prepare them…]

Crack student ‘engagement’ and you’ve cracked 21st century schooling

If you can crack the problem of engagement – not just ‘are you paying attention?’, but ‘are you fascinated by this?’ – if you can crack engagement in deep learning then you’ve cracked 21st century schooling.

Mike Berrill via http://gcouros.com/are-you-fascinated. [yes, it’s a George Couros doubleheader today!]

Also check out the incredible resources to help you create ‘engaging schools’ over at Innovation Unit.

 


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