Are these Illinois students getting the wrong lesson about Twitter and free speech?

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to this blog via e-mail or my RSS feed. I also am on Twitter. Thanks for visiting!

[UPDATE: The high school principal is now threatening to suspend students who protest this situation. Never mind that the administrators' decisions are arguably illegal for many of the suspended students. And apparently also never mind the First Amendment and students' Constitutionally-protected speech rights. The quote from the Supreme Court at the bottom of this post? It's worth reading again...]

If a student calls a teacher a MILF on Twitter, should he be suspended? If other students retweet his tweet – or give it a thumbs up – should they be suspended? The school administrators at Granite City High School in Granite City, Illinois think so. They’ve suspended multiple students for 5 to 10 days apiece (the longer suspensions were related to a student’s tweet that she should blow up the school so that she wouldn’t have to attend).

Unsurprisingly, online reactions have been quick and fierce (as has been the conversation on Facebook). Here are a few tweets since the suspensions:

Freejustice01

Freejustice02

Freejustice03

Freejustice04

Freejustice05

Freejustice06

Freejustice07

Courts have ruled that there is no First Amendment protection for speech that constitutes a ‘true threat.’ When a student says that she should blow up the school so that she doesn’t have to go, is her speech a ‘true threat?’ Arguable at best, but it’s hard to say without knowing more. But when her classmates forward that on, is that worth a suspension? Or maybe just a conversation?

Page 1 of 2 | Next page