Slide – No generation in history…

Industrialage

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[from David Warlick, Happy Birthday Jude]

6 Responses to “Slide – No generation in history…”

  1. I take it you speak ironically. I’m working in the Norwegian secondary school, and many teachers in our system would like to have the pencil as the only way of communicate in writing, regardless that nearly 100 % of our pupils have their own laptop. Luckily, I think we have reached a tipping point of change, accelerated by our upcoming free, open curriculum online, for example science: http://fag.utdanning.no/naturfag

  2. To Einar – Why would your teachers like to only have pencils?

  3. I just gave the book, The Global Achievement Gap, to the headmaster at my school. I’m in my 5th year at this school trying to make a difference in technology integration and 21st century learning principles. I feel good about some of the changes that have taken place with varying levels of administrative support. But, your recent discussions on disruptive innovation are weighing heavily on me. I’m beginning to see that long-term change across the board is not likely to happen here. I see similar issues with higher education. There are educators out there who “get it”. However, when I speak to them one-on-one, they all seem to be in similar school situations. Other than SLA, who out there is really approaching school differently?

  4. Many teachers feel intimidated by laptops. “They are just a nuisance and a disturbance and are not improving learning: get rid of them.”

    But as I said, I think we have reached a turning point, and retirement also makes a change..

  5. That is what I figured you meant. Retirement is very good – I can still remember a few years ago when I had to show one of the other teachers how to use a mouse! That was only 8 years ago.

  6. I love this slide Scott. Today my teachers discussed the Generation We video that you posted a while back… and looked at it through this exact lens. The obsession with standardized tests is narrowing our curriculum focus for an extraordinary generation of children who require just the opposite. It is the subject of my post over on Leadertalk and on my own “El Milagro Weblog”: http://kriley19.wordpress.com/

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