Video – Learning to change

I think I may have just found the opening video for my Monday presentation to the Ames Noon Rotary.

Kudos to the Pearson Foundation Digital Arts Alliance and the Consortium for School Networking (and a hat tip to David Warlick) for a great resource!

8 Responses to “Video – Learning to change”

  1. Having presented a lot more than I have, I’m curious: how effective is a video opener? As opposed to something more personal, but more limited in scope, like an anecdote, a joke, or a teaser.

  2. Of no consequence at all: Pearson Foundation Digital Arts Alliance score their PSA to Texas rockers Explosions in the Sky. Which is awesome.

  3. As with everything, it depends. On how you use it, your audience, the message you’re trying to get across… One advantage of a good video is that it can quickly get people to a thinking place at which you want them to be. Sometimes I start with a video, sometimes I embed one or more within my presentations.

  4. A very enlightening video, I’ll use it to initiate thinking from some of my “stuck in the last century” peers. Anything like this which makes them wonder can be very beneficial.

  5. This video is great. The background music is also really fresh; it reminds me of Explosions in the Sky.

    I love the idea expressed here, of kids as content creators, with school being the venue where they come together to network and collaborate.

    The International Science and Engineering Fair, taking place this week in Atlanta, seems to fit that model on a global scale: kids are from all over the world, having labored on projects to advance scientific understanding or employ technology to improve life in developing countries, find themselves in one place for a week to learn from each other. In the process, they are blogging and twittering, effectively serving as a model of information sharing. It’s a fascinating thing to watch.

  6. Excellent video. Thanks. I also thought it was somewhat inspirational in terms of our need to teach differently. Education is changing, and the need for it is changing too. I like David Warlick’s statement (at a conference recently in Vancouver, B.C) that our students see information as raw material rather than product. They can mix and mash in ways those of us who have to work to learn this stuff rather than having it be intuitive, can often not even imagine. I’m fascinated with what gets produced. A great example is a little piece produced by Alan Becker posted under Animator vs Animation on You Tube. If you haven’t seen it, it is well worth checking out. Cute and pithy.

  7. Bud the Teacher blogged this too, prompting dismissive comments from Tom Hoffman and Will Richardson. http://tinyurl.com/5r8aac

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